Health and Wellness

ACT: Taking Hurt to Hope

JoAnne Dahl, Ph.D.

ACT: Taking Hurt to Hope – Training the Brain for Compassion

Welcome to ACT taking hurt to hope. Today we are going to have an enlightening conversation about the three pounds of soft gooshy tissue we all carry between our ears. Our brains. Our brains are the most complex object know in the universe. Understanding some basic characteristics about how our brains work can be of great help to us in developing our own wellbeing. Today you will get the chance to listen to an expert. Dr Rick Hanson. Rick is a neuropsychologist who writes and teaches about the essential inner skills of personal well-being, psychological growth and contemplative practice as well as about relationships family life and raising children. Rick is the author of several books, his latest book Just one thing, Developing a Buddha Brain One Simple practice as a Time shows a 52 down to earth practices of how to build up a buddha brain for more peace of mind in stressful times. You can read more about Rick and his articles books and audio book on his website which you can get to by clicking on his name on this week’s Taking hurt to hope. The founder Wellspring Institute for Neuroscience and contemplative wisdom.

Remember that ACT has three principles. Relevant to this program these principles might look like this: Opening up, practice opening up not only to the mind’s map of reality but rather to reality itself that we perceive via sensations thru our 5 senses, hearing, touching, smelling, tasting and seeing. The second principle is becoming aware of the difference between reality and our mental representatioin of reality that our mind presents, . Understanding this difference is a critical prerequisite for behavior change. The third principle is ACTing is directions that matter to you which as we will hear today will probably focus on compassionate behavior towards others and towards ourselves.

Today’s guest is Dr Rick Hanson. Rick is a neuropsychologist who writes and teaches about the essential inner skills of personal well-being, psychological growth and contemplative practice as well as about relationships family life and raising children. Rick is the author of several books, his latest book Just one thing, Developing a Buddha Brain One Simple practice as a Time shows a 52 down to earth practices of how to build up a buddha brain for more peace of mind in stressful times. You can read more about Rick and his articles books and audio book on his website which you can get to by clicking on his name on this week’s Taking hurt to hope.